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Traveling at light speed, how long would it take to get to the nearest galaxy?

Traveling at the speed of light, how long would it take to get to the next galaxy? Thank you for you greatly, appreciated, time.

The closest galaxy is the recently discovered Canis Major dwarf galaxy, which is "only" 25,000 light-years away.

So it would take 25,000 years to get there if you traveled at the speed of light. Actually, that's the amount of time it would take from the perspective of the outside world. From the perspective of a traveler moving at the speed of light, it would appear to take no time at all. That's because of relativistic "time dilation", as explained here.

November 2004, Christopher Springob (more by Christopher Springob) (Like this Answer)

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